When your employees go too far on social media…

14671099_ml

I recently did some work for a client that involved looking into recent Canadian legal cases dealing with employees that have been either fired or reprimanded for their conduct on social media platforms.  I ended up using some of these cases as examples in an internal training program I developed for employees on “responsible digital engagement”. I thought I’d share a few of them with you today.

All five of these cases reinforce my firm belief that every employee of a modern organization should take the following five tips to heart:

  1. Read your existing policies related to values and ethics (especially if you don’t have any official social media engagement guidelines/policies in place).
  2. Be aware that employers can legally monitor your online behaviour on public channels 24/7. If it’s not your employer doing so, then some stranger likely is.
  3. Work under the assumption that all of your posts are public, even so-called “private” ones.
  4. If you wouldn’t be comfortable saying something in a packed room of people, don’t say it online.
  5. Use caution and good judgement. If you’re even slightly unsure as to whether or not something is kosher to post about, ask your HR rep or supervisor. Continue reading “When your employees go too far on social media…”

Great “behind-the-scenes” progress in 2013, now let’s get creative!

creativity

Typically at this time of year I tend to write a few thoughts surrounding my hopes and expectations for digital engagement in the public sector sphere here in Canada. I must admit that I am quite optimistic about the next twelve months, given the amount of  behind-the-scenes progress that has been made to date in various organizations in terms of setting up the necessary infrastructure that social channels require (primarily governance and hr related). Continue reading “Great “behind-the-scenes” progress in 2013, now let’s get creative!”

“Social Media At Work” Video for Canadian Public Servants

Any time I see a government effort in using video these days I like to applaud it. Providing information in an appealing visual format that is designed with the web in mind first , will soon be standard practice (that’s my hope anyway). Remember, it’s not about getting the most views on YouTube, but rather understanding that YouTube is the world’s second largest search engine. Any time you post up a video you place a powerful digital footprint on the web for others to find. This is especially true if you tag and title the video strategically based on search patterns. The embedded video below was created and released by Transport Canada. It was adapted, with permission, from an original version developed by the Department of Justice (Victoria, Australia). The video explains in a simple , visual manner the key points (relevant to all public servants) of the Guideline on External Use of Web 2.0 , which was released by the Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat in late 2011.  It should be watched by every public servant and in my own personal opinion added as a supplemental video to the Treasury Board website (on the guideline page) for added visibility. Enjoy.

The French version can be found here.